From the hard-boiled detective Philip Marlowe to the seedy underworlds of Los Angeles, Chandler’s iconic stories…


The Big Lebowski. Poster of the 1998 movie and cover of the 1939 book, The Big Sleep
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The Big Sleep
Raymond Chandler, 1939
movie vs book
Joel Coen, 1998

An odd comedy involving White Russians, bowling, a severed toe, and a guy named The Dude. Jeff ‘The Dude’ Lebowski isn’t interested in drama and isn’t even interested in working. But when his rug is damaged in a bizarre case of mistaken identity, he is forced to set out on a hunt with his bowling mates.


The Big Lebowski. Poster of the 1998 movie and cover of the 1953 book, The Long Goodbye
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The Long Goodbye
Raymond Chandler, 1953
movie vs book
Joel Coen, 1998

An odd comedy involving White Russians, bowling, a severed toe, and a guy named The Dude. Jeff ‘The Dude’ Lebowski isn’t interested in drama and isn’t even interested in working. But when his rug is damaged in a bizarre case of mistaken identity, he is forced to set out on a hunt with his bowling mates.


The Big Sleep. Poster of the 1946 movie and cover of the 1939 book
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The Big Sleep
Raymond Chandler, 1939
movie vs book
Howard Hawks, 1946

Private detective Philip Marlowe is summoned to the mansion of General Sternwood, who wants to resolve ‘gambling debts’ that his daughter Carmen owes to bookseller Arthur Geiger. She suspects her father’s true motive for hiring a detective is to find his protégé Sean Regan who had mysteriously disappeared a month earlier.


The Long Goodbye. Poster of the 1973 movie and cover of the 1953 book
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The Long Goodbye
Raymond Chandler, 1953
movie vs book
Robert Altman, 1973

Late one night, private investigator Philip Marlowe is visited by his close friend Terry Lennox, who asks for a lift from Los Angeles to the California–Mexico border at Tijuana. Marlowe obliges. On returning home, Marlowe is met by two police detectives who accuse Lennox of having murdered his rich wife, Sylvia.


Murder, My Sweet. Poster of the 1944 movie and cover of the 1940 book, Farewell, My Lovely
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Farewell, My Lovely
Raymond Chandler, 1940
movie vs book
Edward Dmytryk, 1944

Marlowe accepts a task to find Velma, Moose Malloy’s girlfriend. Velma hasn’t been seen in six years, and Malloy, a minor offender, was just released from prison after serving a seven-year sentence. A seemingly straightforward case of a missing individual, however, turns out to be much more complicated than Marlowe could have ever imagined as initially encouraging clues lead to a convoluted web of fraud, bribery, perjury, and theft in which no one’s purpose is obvious, least of all Marlowe’s.


Farewell, My Lovely. Poster of the 1975 movie and cover of the 1940 book
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Farewell, My Lovely
Raymond Chandler, 1940
movie vs book
Dick Richards, 1975

A Philip Marlowe’s case, the death of a client and the hunt for an ex-long-lost convict’s love, take a nasty turn when they start to intertwine, dragging the private eye deeper and deeper into 1940s Los Angeles’ seedy underbelly. It appears that Marlowe might be the next person to pass out as the stakes are heightened and the death toll rises.


Lady in the Lake. Poster of the 1946 movie and cover of the 1943 book, The Lady in the Lake
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The Lady in the Lake
Raymond Chandler, 1943
movie vs book
Robert Montgomery, 1946

A publisher hires Phillip Marlowe to track down his wife, who is rumored to have fled to Mexico. But as soon as someone is killed, the matter gets considerably more complicated. The private investigator gets entangled in a murder soon after.


The Big Sleep. Poster of the 1978 movie and cover of the 1939 book
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The Big Sleep
Raymond Chandler, 1939
movie vs book
Michael Winner, 1978

In 1970s England, private detective Philip Marlowe is asked to the stately home of General Sternwood, who hires Marlowe to learn who is blackmailing him. While at the mansion, he meets the general’s spoiled and inquisitive daughter Charlotte and wild younger daughter Camilla.


Marlowe. Poster of the 1969 movie and cover of the 1949 book, The Little Sister
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The Little Sister
Raymond Chandler, 1949
movie vs book
Paul Bogart, 1969

Philip Marlowe, a private investigator, struggles to earn five hundred dollars. However, if it’s paid for with a bribe, it might as well only be five cents. When Winslow Wong’s offer of money is rejected, Wong immediately turns the detective’s office into a junkyard.


The Brasher Doubloon. Poster of the 1947 movie and cover of the 1942 book, The High Window
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The High Window
Raymond Chandler, 1942
movie vs book
John Brahm, 1947

Elizabeth Murdock, a wealthy widow, hires private investigator Philip Marlowe to look into the loss of a rare coin, the Brasher Doubloon, from her late husband’s personal collection. When Marlowe initially thinks the investigation is rather ordinary, a murder, a string of dubious personalities, and dangerous criminals soon face him.


The Falcon Takes Over. Poster of the 1942 movie and cover of the 1940 book, Farewell, My Lovely
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Farewell, My Lovely
Raymond Chandler, 1940
movie vs book
Irving Reis, 1942

In search of his ex-girlfriend Velma one night in New York, burly fugitive felon Moose Malloy causes mayhem in his wake. The Falcon, an intrepid traveler, is intrigued by the appearance of Velma and decides to investigate on his own. He does so by talking to a variety of sketchy people and alluring women in order to get to the bottom of the mystery.


Poodle Springs. Poster of the 1998 movie and cover of the 1989 book
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Poodle Springs
Raymond Chandler, Robert B. Parker, 1989
movie vs book
Bob Rafelson, 1998

Marlowe, who is in his middle age, has gained a few pounds and a new wife named Laura, a wealthy heiress, in 1963. The couple resides in a home that Laura’s father gave them in Poodle Springs, California, near the Nevada line. Marlowe is released after being falsely accused of murder thanks to Laura, and he is then recruited to find a gambler who owes $100,000. Marlowe discovers a blackmail plot involving stripper Lola while looking into the lowlife photographer Larry Victor.

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“You either ignore the comic book and make a great movie or you stay very close to the comic book.”

MATTHEW VAUGHN (Filmmaker)